Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Cases Miner Bone Metab. 2013 Jan;10(1):11-4. doi: 10.11138/ccmbm/2013.10.1.011.

Skeletal muscle: an endocrine organ.

Author information

1
Department of Critical Care Medicine and Surgery, Unit of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Florence and "Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi", Florence, Italy.

Abstract

Tropism and efficiency of skeletal muscle depend on the complex balance between anabolic and catabolic factors. This balance gradually deteriorates with aging, leading to an age-related decline in muscle quantity and quality, called sarcopenia: this condition plays a central role in physical and functional impairment in late life. The knowledge of the mechanisms that induce sarcopenia and the ability to prevent or counteract them, therefore, can greatly contribute to the prevention of disability and probably also mortality in the elderly. It is well known that skeletal muscle is the target of numerous hormones, but only in recent years studies have shown a role of skeletal muscle as a secretory organ of cytokines and other peptides, denominated myokines (IL6, IL8, IL15, Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and leukaemia inhibitory factor), which have autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine actions and are deeply involved in inflammatory processes. Physical inactivity promotes an unbalance between these substances towards a pro-inflammatory status, thus favoring the vicious circle of sarcopenia, accumulation of fat - especially visceral - and development of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, dementia and depression, according to what has been called "the diseasome of physical inactivity".

KEYWORDS:

aging; myokine; sarcopenia; skeletal muscle

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center