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Transgenic Res. 2013 Dec;22(6):1225-9. doi: 10.1007/s11248-013-9730-7. Epub 2013 Jul 13.

Transformation of Althaea officinalis L. by Agrobacterium rhizogenes for the production of transgenic roots expressing the anti-HIV microbicide cyanovirin-N.

Author information

1
Molecular Immunology Unit, Research Centre for Infection and Immunity, St. George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London, SW17 0RE, UK, pdrake@sgul.ac.uk.

Abstract

The marshmallow plant (Althaea officinalis L.) has been used for centuries in medicine and other applications. Valuable secondary metabolites have previously been identified in Agrobacterium rhizogenes-generated transgenic 'hairy' roots in this species. In the present study, transgenic roots were produced in A. officinalis using A. rhizogenes. In addition to wild-type lines, roots expressing the anti-human immunodeficiency virus microbicide candidate, cyanovirin-N (CV-N), were generated. Wild-type and CV-N root lines were transferred to liquid culture and increased in mass by 49 and 19 % respectively over a 7 day culture period. In the latter, the concentration of CV-N present in the root tissue was 2.4 μg/g fresh weight, with an average secretion rate into the growth medium of 0.02 μg/ml/24 h. A. officinalis transgenic roots may therefore in the future be used not only as a source of therapeutic secondary metabolites, but also as an expression system for the production of recombinant pharmaceuticals.

PMID:
23852261
DOI:
10.1007/s11248-013-9730-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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