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BMJ Open. 2013 Jul 11;3(7). pii: e002944. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-002944. Print 2013.

Long-term change in alcohol-consumption status and variations in fibrinogen levels: the coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) study.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine long-term associations between change in alcohol-consumption status and cessation of alcohol use, and fibrinogen levels in a large, young, biracial cohort.

DESIGN:

Analysis of covariance models were used to analyse participants within the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) cohort who had fibrinogen and alcohol use data at year 7 (1992-1993; ages 25-37) and year 20 examinations.

SETTING:

4 urban US cities.

PATIENTS:

2520 men and women within the CARDIA cohort.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

13-year changes in alcohol use related to changes in fibrinogen.

RESULTS:

Over 13 years, mean fibrinogen increased by 71 vs 70 mg/dL (p=NS) in black men (BM) versus white men (WM), and 78 vs 68 mg/dL (p<0.05) in black women (BW) versus white women (WW), respectively. Compared with never-drinkers, there were smaller longitudinal increases in fibrinogen for BM, BW and WW (but a larger increase in WM) who became or stayed drinkers, after multivariable adjustment. For BM, WM and WW, fibrinogen increased the most among persons who quit drinking over 13 years (p<0.001 for WM (fibrinogen increase=86.5 (7.1) (mean (SE))), compared with never-drinkers (fibrinogen increase=53.1 (5.4)).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this young cohort, compared with the participants who never drank, those who became/stayed drinkers had smaller increases, while those who quit drinking had the highest increase in fibrinogen over 13 years of follow-up. The results provide a novel insight into the mechanism for the established protective effect of moderate alcohol intake on cardiovascular disease outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Preventive Medicine

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