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Mol Plant Pathol. 2013 Dec;14(9):861-9. doi: 10.1111/mpp.12058. Epub 2013 Jul 10.

The genus Striga: a witch profile.

Author information

1
RIKEN Centre for Sustainable Resource Science, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, 230-0045, Japan.

Abstract

The genus Striga comprises about 30 obligate root-parasitic plants, commonly known as witchweeds. In particular, S. hermonthica, S. asiatica and S. gesnerioides cause immense losses to major stable crops in sub-Saharan Africa. Most Striga species parasitize grass species (Poaceae), but Striga gesnerioides has evolved to parasitize dicotyledonous plants. Aspects of phylogeny, economic impact, parasitic life style and molecular discoveries are briefly reviewed to profile one of the main biotic constraints to African agriculture.

TAXONOMY:

Striga Lour.; Kingdom Plant; Division Angiospermae; Clade Eudicots; Order Laminales; Family Orobanchaceae.

IMPORTANT HOSTS:

Sorghum Moench., maize (Zea mays L.), rice (Oryza L.), sugarcane (Saccharum L.), pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.], cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.].

DISEASE SYMPTOMS:

Stunted growth, drought-stressed-like appearance, in severe cases chlorosis and necrosis.

ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE:

1 billion $US per annum.

DISEASE CONTROL:

Hand weeding, breeding, chemical control, intercropping with catch or trap crops.

USEFUL WEBPAGES:

http://ppgp.huck.psu.edu; http://striga.psc.riken.jp.

PMID:
23841683
DOI:
10.1111/mpp.12058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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