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JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Sep;167(9):808-15. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.317.

Infant exposures and development of type 1 diabetes mellitus: The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY).

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1
Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Aurora.

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

The incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is increasing worldwide, with the most rapid increase among children younger than 5 years of age.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the associations between perinatal and infant exposures, especially early infant diet, and the development of T1DM.

DESIGN:

The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) is a longitudinal, observational study.

SETTING:

Newborn screening for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) was done at St. Joseph's Hospital in Denver, Colorado. First-degree relatives of individuals with T1DM were recruited from the Denver metropolitan area.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 1835 children at increased genetic risk for T1DM followed up from birth with complete prospective assessment of infant diet. Fifty-three children developed T1DM.

EXPOSURES:

Early (<4 months of age) and late (≥6 months of age) first exposure to solid foods compared with first exposures at 4 to 5 months of age (referent).

MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE:

Risk for T1DM diagnosed by a physician.

RESULTS:

Both early and late first exposure to any solid food predicted development of T1DM (hazard ratio [HR], 1.91; 95% CI, 1.04-3.51, and HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.26-7.24, respectively), adjusting for the HLA-DR genotype, first-degree relative with T1DM, maternal education, and delivery type. Specifically, early exposure to fruit and late exposure to rice/oat predicted T1DM (HR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.14-4.39, and HR, 2.88; 95% CI, 1.36-6.11, respectively), while breastfeeding at the time of introduction to wheat/barley conferred protection (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26-0.86). Complicated vaginal delivery was also a predictor of T1DM (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.03-3.61).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

These results suggest the safest age to introduce solid foods in children at increased genetic risk for T1DM is between 4 and 5 months of age. Breastfeeding while introducing new foods may reduce T1DM risk.

PMID:
23836309
PMCID:
PMC4038357
DOI:
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.317
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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