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J Sch Health. 2013 Aug;83(8):573-81. doi: 10.1111/josh.12067.

The association of screen time, television in the bedroom, and obesity among school-aged youth: 2007 National Survey of Children's Health.

Author information

1
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE Mail Stop K-26, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, USA. HWethington@cdc.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Among school-aged youth, we sought to identify characteristics associated with (1) exceeding screen time recommendations (ie, television/videos/video games more than 2 hours/weekday), and (2) exceeding screen time recommendations, the presence of a television in the bedroom, and obesity.

METHODS:

Using 2007 National Survey of Children's Health data, we used multivariable logistic regression to identify sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics associated with excessive screen time among 6 to 11- and 12 to 17-year-olds on a typical weekday. For 12 to 17-year-olds only, we used logistic regression to examine the odds of obesity using the same variables as above, with the addition of screen time.

RESULTS:

Overall, 20.8% of 6 to 11-year-olds and 26.1% of 12 to 17-year-olds had excessive screen time. For both age groups, having a bedroom TV was significantly associated with excessive screen time. For the older age group, the dual scenario of excessive screen time with a bedroom TV had the strongest association with obesity (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.9, 3.2).

CONCLUSIONS:

Given the similar risk factors for excess screen time and having a TV in the bedroom, a public health challenge exists to design interventions to reduce screen time among school-aged youth.

KEYWORDS:

child and adolescent health; nutrition and diet; physical fitness and sport; public health

PMID:
23834609
PMCID:
PMC4681440
DOI:
10.1111/josh.12067
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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