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Sci Pharm. 2013 Apr-Jun;81(2):549-58. doi: 10.3797/scipharm.1207-17. Epub 2013 Jan 7.

Preventive effects of curcumin against drug- and starvation-induced gastric erosions in rats.

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1
Neurochemistry and Biochemical, Neuropharmacological Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan.

Abstract

The present study was designed to investigate the gastroprotective, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of curcumin (Cur), the major constituent of turmeric. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was used in this study as a standard drug for comparison. The analgesic activity was measured using the Hot-Plate Test. The antipyretic and antiulcer effects were assessed using yeast-induced pyrexia and gastric ulceration, respectively. Curcumin (100 mg/kg) injected intra-peritoneally 1 hr prior to the Hot-Plate Test showed significant analgesic activity expressed by both parameters: an increase in latency time and a reduction in paw licking as compared to the controls. In the animal model of pyrexia, curcumin (100 mg/kg injected intra-peritoneally) exhibited a significant reduction in the rectal temperature after 1 hr, 2 hrs, 4 hrs, and 5 hrs of treatment, indicating the antipyretic effect of curcumin. Rats with orally administered curcumin (200 mg/kg) did not show any lesions on the inner lining of the stomach after a 16 hr fast, indicating the gastroprotective effects of curcumin as compared to saline- and acetylsalicylic acid-administered rats. The significantly low ulcer index in curcumin-treated rats following starvation highlights the gastroprotective characteristics of curcumin.

KEYWORDS:

Acetylsalicylic acid; Antinociceptive; Antipyretic; Curcumin; Gastroprotective

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