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Ital J Pediatr. 2013 Jul 6;39:42. doi: 10.1186/1824-7288-39-42.

CD19 + CD23+ B cells, CD4 + CD25+ T cells, E-selectin and interleukin-12 levels in children with steroid sensitive nephrotic syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, TR 26480, Turkey. bilalyn@yahoo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND METHODS:

Soluble-lymphocyte subsets (sCD19 + CD23+ B cells and sCD4 + CD25+ T cells), soluble-adhesion molecules (sE-selectin) and interleukin-12 (sIL-12) were assayed to evaluate the pathogenesis of steroid sensitive nephrotic syndrome in 48 patients diagnosed with steroid sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) in active (AS) and remission stages (RS).

RESULTS:

The ratios of soluble CD19 and sCD19 + CD23 increased in patients with AS with respect to the patients with RS and controls (p < 0.05). Increased sCD19 + CD23 ratios were preserved in the patients with RS when compared with the controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, the ratios of sCD4 + CD25 lymphocyte subsets were not significantly different among the groups. Similarly, serum sIL-12 levels were not considerably disparate between the AS and RS. Serum sE-selectin levels were higher in the patients with AS relative to the controls (p < 0.01) and RS (p < 0.05). No significant correlations were noted between sE-selectin and lymphocyte subset ratios, serum sIL-12 and immunoglobulin levels. There was a positive correlation between sE-selectin, triglyceride (r = 0.757, p < 0.0001) and cholesterol (r = 0.824, p < 0.0001) levels in patients with the AS.

CONCLUSION:

The present results indicate that the patients with SSNS appear to have abnormalities in sCD23 + CD19+ cells, defect in T regulatory cell activity, and injury in endothelial cells as indicated by the presence high sE-selectin. These abnormalities might play a role in the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome. sIL-12 seems to have no role in pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome reflecting normal Th1 response.

PMID:
23830064
PMCID:
PMC3720568
DOI:
10.1186/1824-7288-39-42
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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