Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2013 Aug 2;341(6145):569-73. doi: 10.1126/science.1241165. Epub 2013 Jul 4.

The microbial metabolites, short-chain fatty acids, regulate colonic Treg cell homeostasis.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Regulatory T cells (Tregs) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 are critical for regulating intestinal inflammation. Candidate microbe approaches have identified bacterial species and strain-specific molecules that can affect intestinal immune responses, including species that modulate Treg responses. Because neither all humans nor mice harbor the same bacterial strains, we posited that more prevalent factors exist that regulate the number and function of colonic Tregs. We determined that short-chain fatty acids, gut microbiota-derived bacterial fermentation products, regulate the size and function of the colonic Treg pool and protect against colitis in a Ffar2-dependent manner in mice. Our study reveals that a class of abundant microbial metabolites underlies adaptive immune microbiota coadaptation and promotes colonic homeostasis and health.

PMID:
23828891
PMCID:
PMC3807819
DOI:
10.1126/science.1241165
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center