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Prev Med. 2013 Nov;57(5):466-70. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.06.024. Epub 2013 Jul 1.

Predictors for moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity during an 18-month coordinated school health intervention.

Author information

1
Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: dseo@ewha.ac.kr.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate if the HEROES Initiative, a school-based childhood obesity prevention program based on the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s coordinated school health approach was able to effectively increase physical activity among elementary and middle school students who were exposed to the program for 18 months and to determine student and school-level predictors of success.

METHOD:

Students who participated in physiological data collection were invited to participate in a survey at baseline, 6 months, and 18 months (N=1091, 8 schools). The dropout rate at 18 months was 39.1% when graduates were counted. Data was analyzed using generalized estimating equations.

RESULTS:

A significant increase (p=.0067) was observed in vigorous-intensity physical activity (VPA) but a non-significant increase (p=.1753) was observed in moderate-intensity physical activity (MPA). Each school's implementation fidelity score was also only associated with VPA increases. Students' screen time and vegetable/fruit intake were independently associated with both VPA and MPA increases. Body mass index of students was not predictive of VPA or MPA changes.

CONCLUSION:

An 18-month school-based intervention that employs the CDC's coordinated school health approach appears to be effective in increasing physical activity among elementary and middle school children.

KEYWORDS:

Intervention; Obesity; Physical activity; School health

PMID:
23827719
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.06.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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