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Intern Emerg Med. 2013 Sep;8(6):529-36. doi: 10.1007/s11739-013-0973-3. Epub 2013 Jul 4.

The association of near infrared spectroscopy-derived StO2 measurements and biomarkers of endothelial activation in sepsis.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine and Center for Vascular Biology Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. sskibste@bidmc.harvard.edu

Abstract

Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) may be utilized in conjunction with a vascular occlusion test to quantify a tissue bed's ability to re-oxygenate by measuring continuous tissue oxygen saturation recovery rate. We hypothesize that NIRS recovery slope will be associated with expression of endothelial biomarkers, thus, making it a feasible bedside surrogate for assessing endothelial activation/dysfunction in patients with sepsis. A secondary analysis of a prospective, multicenter, observational study was done on a convenience sample of adult patients at four university emergency departments consisting of patients with septic shock, sepsis without shock and patients without infection. At enrollment we measured the NIRS-derived measurements and collected plasma to assay biomarkers of endothelial activation. 186 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 63 (± 16) years with 60 % male gender. Univariate analysis assessing the linear relationship between the recovery slope with endothelial biomarkers, found a weak but statistical significant association between NIRS recovery slope and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFLT-1) and tPAI-1 (r = -0.08, p < 0.0001 and r = -0.06, p = 0.002). When adjusting for diabetes, age and sequential organ failure assessment score at enrollment, only sFLT-1 persisted having a statistically significant association (r = -0.04, p = 0.01). We found a weak, but statistically significant relationship between NIRS-derived measurements and biomarkers of endothelial activation/dysfunction in patients with sepsis. This study fails to support the use of NIRS-derived measurements as a clinical or research tool to identify patients with endothelial cell activation/dysfunction and informs researchers that this is not a robust option for identifying this lesion at the bedside.

PMID:
23824446
DOI:
10.1007/s11739-013-0973-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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