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Clin Microbiol Rev. 2013 Jul;26(3):493-504. doi: 10.1128/CMR.00103-12.

Paragonimiasis acquired in the United States: native and nonnative species.

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1
Program in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, and Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. jdiaz@lsuhsc.edu

Abstract

Paragonimiasis is a parasitic lung infection caused by lung flukes of the genus Paragonimus, with most cases reported from Asia and caused by P. westermani following consumption of raw or undercooked crustaceans. With the exception of imported P. westermani cases in immigrants, in travelers returning from areas of disease endemicity, and in clusters of acquired cases following consumption of imported Asian crabs, human paragonimiasis caused by native lung flukes is rarely described in the United States, which has only one indigenous species of lung fluke, Paragonimus kellicotti. Clinicians should inquire about the consumption of raw or undercooked freshwater crabs by immigrants, expatriates, and returning travelers, and the consumption of raw or undercooked crayfish in U.S. freshwater river systems where P. kellicotti is endemic when evaluating patients presenting with unexplained fever, cough, rales, hemoptysis, pleural effusions, and peripheral eosinophilia. Diagnostic evaluation by specific parasitological, radiological, serological, and molecular methods will be required in order to differentiate paragonimiasis from tuberculosis, which is not uncommon in recent Asian immigrants. All cases of imported and locally acquired paragonimiasis will require treatment with oral praziquantel to avoid any potential pulmonary and cerebral complications of paragonimiasis, some of which may require surgical interventions.

PMID:
23824370
PMCID:
PMC3719489
DOI:
10.1128/CMR.00103-12
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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