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Sensors (Basel). 2013 Jul 3;13(7):8523-33. doi: 10.3390/s130708523.

Major odorants released as urinary volatiles by urinary incontinent patients.

Author information

1
Atmospheric Environment Laboratory, Department of Environment & Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747, Korea. skpbhu@gmail.com

Abstract

In this study, volatile urinary components were collected using three different types of samples from patients suffering from urinary incontinence (UI): (1) urine (A); (2) urine + non-used pad (B); and (3) urine + used pad (C). In addition, urine + non-used pad (D) samples from non-patients were also collected as a reference. The collection of urinary volatiles was conducted with the aid of a glass impinger-based mini-chamber method. Each of the four sample types (A through D) was placed in a glass impinger and incubated for 4 hours at 37 °C. Ultra pure air was then passed through the chamber, and volatile urine gas components were collected into Tedlar bags at the other end. These bag samples were then analyzed for a wide range of VOCs and major offensive odorants (e.g., reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs), carbonyls, trimethylamine (TMA), ammonia, etc.). Among the various odorants, sulfur compounds (methanethiol and hydrogen sulfide) and aldehydes (acetaldehyde, butylaldehyde, and isovaleraldehyde) were detected above odor threshold and predicted to contribute most effectively to odor intensity of urine incontinence.

PMID:
23823973
PMCID:
PMC3758608
DOI:
10.3390/s130708523
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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