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Mol Autism. 2013 Jul 1;4(1):23. doi: 10.1186/2040-2392-4-23.

Increased gene expression of FOXP1 in patients with autism spectrum disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, No,1 Jen-Ai Rd, Section 1, Taipei, Taiwan. gaushufe@ntu.edu.tw.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Comparative gene expression profiling analysis is useful in discovering differentially expressed genes associated with various diseases, including mental disorders. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of complex childhood-onset neurodevelopmental and genetic disorders characterized by deficits in language development and verbal communication, impaired reciprocal social interaction, and the presence of repetitive behaviors or restricted interests. The study aimed to identify novel genes associated with the pathogenesis of ASD.

METHODS:

We conducted comparative total gene expression profiling analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) between 16 male patients with ASD and 16 male control subjects to screen differentially expressed genes associated with ASD. We verified one of the differentially expressed genes, FOXP1, using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in a sample of 83 male patients and 83 male controls that included the initial 16 male patients and male controls, respectively.

RESULTS:

A total of 252 differentially expressed probe sets representing 202 genes were detected between the two groups, including 89 up- and 113 downregulated genes in the ASD group. RT-qPCR verified significant elevation of the FOXP1 gene transcript of LCL in a sample of 83 male patients (10.46 ± 11.34) compared with 83 male controls (5.17 ± 8.20, P = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Comparative gene expression profiling analysis of LCL is useful in discovering novel genetic markers associated with ASD. Elevated gene expression of FOXP1 might contribute to the pathogenesis of ASD.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Identifier: NCT00494754.

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