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Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2014 Sep;22(9):2223-7. doi: 10.1007/s00167-013-2582-0. Epub 2013 Jun 30.

Evaluation of the coracoclavicular reconstruction using LARS artificial ligament in acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The most appropriate procedure for surgical treatment of severe acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation was still not clear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of coracoclavicular (CC) reconstruction with ligament augmentation and reconstruction system (LARS) artificial ligaments for the treatment of acute complete AC joint dislocation.

METHODS:

Twenty-four patients (16 male and 8 female, ages ranged from 21 to 45) with acute complete AC joint dislocations were treated with CC reconstruction using LARS artificial ligaments. All these dislocations were unstable injuries. Clinical evaluation was used by the Constant scores and VAS. The radiographic evaluation consisted of Zanca radiographs for bilateral AC joint and axillary radiographs for the injured shoulder.

RESULTS:

All patients had follow-up times of 36 months (range 6-60). The Constant scores rose from 62.3 ± 6.9 preoperatively to 94.5 ± 9.3 at final evaluation (P < 0.05). Preoperative VAS scores were 5.1 ± 1.7, and the VAS scores at the last review were 0.7 ± 1.4 (P < 0.05). Follow-up radiographs showed anatomical reduction in 20 patients and slight loss of reduction in 4 patients. Calcification of CC ligament in 4 patients, degenerative change around the AC joint in 2 patient and clavicular osteolysis around screws in one patient were found.

CONCLUSIONS:

LARS artificial ligament for reconstruction of CC can provide immediate stability and allow early shoulder mobilization with good functional results and few complications. This procedure was an effective and safe method to treat grade III and more AC joint dislocations.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

IV.

PMID:
23812536
DOI:
10.1007/s00167-013-2582-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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