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J Affect Disord. 2013 Sep 25;150(3):1167-73. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2013.05.084. Epub 2013 Jun 27.

Altered overnight modulation of spontaneous waking EEG reflects altered sleep homeostasis in major depressive disorder: a high-density EEG investigation.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA. dplante@wisc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prior investigations have suggested sleep homeostasis is altered in major depressive disorder (MDD). Low frequency activity (LFA) in the electroencephalogram during waking has been correlated with sleep slow wave activity (SWA), suggesting that waking LFA reflects sleep homeostasis in healthy individuals. This study investigated whether the overnight change in waking LFA and its relationship with sleep SWA are altered in MDD.

METHODS:

256-channel high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) recordings during waking (pre- and post-sleep) and during sleep were collected in 14 unmedicated, unipolar MDD subjects (9 women) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC).

RESULTS:

Waking LFA (3.25-6.25 Hz) declined significantly overnight in the HC group, but not in the group of MDD subjects. Overnight decline of waking LFA correlated with sleep SWA in frontal brain regions in HC, but a comparable relationship was not found in MDD.

LIMITATIONS:

This study is not able to definitely segregate overnight changes in the waking EEG that may occur due to homeostatic and/or circadian factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

MDD involves altered overnight modulation of waking low frequency EEG activity that may reflect altered sleep homeostasis in the disorder. Future research is required to determine the functional significance and clinical implications of these findings.

KEYWORDS:

High-density EEG; Major depressive disorder; Waking EEG

PMID:
23810359
PMCID:
PMC3760229
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2013.05.084
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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