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J Sci Med Sport. 2014 Jul;17(4):425-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.05.015. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

Flow-mediated dilation and exercise blood pressure in healthy adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, United States; Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, United States. Electronic address: mjl106@pitt.edu.
2
Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, United States.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, United States.
4
USDA, ARS, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Center, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Exercise blood pressure is a robust predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. Endothelial dysfunction occurs early in development of cardiovascular disease and is associated with greater exercise blood pressure in adults. However, it is not yet clear whether endothelial function is associated with exercise blood pressure in youth. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between endothelial function, indexed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, and submaximal exercise blood pressure in healthy adolescents.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

METHODS:

Adolescents (N=45) completed a graded submaximal treadmill test. Blood pressure was measured during rest and each exercise stage. Ultrasound measurement of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation was completed on a separate visit. Pearson correlations and multiple regression were used to assess the unadjusted and multivariate adjusted associations between flow-mediated dilation and exercise blood pressure, respectively.

RESULTS:

Lower flow-mediated dilation was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure (r=0.37, p=0.01) and greater pulse pressure (r=-0.38, p=0.01) during exercise. The significance did not change when adjusting for age, gender, fitness, or resting blood pressure. Exploratory analyses suggest that flow-mediated dilation was associated with exercise diastolic blood pressure primarily among adolescents with low resting diastolic blood pressure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Studies in youth are important to understand the early pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Findings from this study suggest that endothelial function may play a role in regulating blood pressure responses during submaximal exercise in healthy adolescents.

KEYWORDS:

Blood pressure; Cardiovascular disease; Endothelial function; Exercise; Youth

PMID:
23809838
PMCID:
PMC4020997
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2013.05.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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