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J Voice. 2013 Jul;27(4):401-10. doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2013.04.002.

Toward validation of the cepstral spectral index of dysphonia (CSID) as an objective treatment outcomes measure.

Author information

1
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. Peterson.elizabeth.anne@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the validity of the Cepstral Spectral Index of Dysphonia (CSID) as an objective treatment outcomes measure of dysphonia severity.

METHOD:

Pre- and posttreatment samples of sustained vowel and connected speech productions were elicited from 112 patients across six diagnostic categories: unilateral vocal fold paralysis, adductor spasmodic dysphonia, primary muscle tension dysphonia, benign vocal fold lesions, presbylaryngis, and mutational falsetto. Listener ratings of severity in connected speech were compared with a three-factor CSID model consisting of the cepstral peak prominence (CPP), the low-to-high spectral energy ratio, and its standard deviation. Two additional variables, the CPP standard deviation and gender, were included in the five-factor CSID model to estimate severity of vowels.

RESULTS:

CSID-estimated severity for sustained vowels and connected speech was strongly associated with listener ratings pretreatment, posttreatment, and change observed pre- to posttreatment. Spectrum effects were examined, and severity of dysphonia did not influence the relationship between listener perceived severity and CSID-estimated severity.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results confirm a robust relationship between listener perceived and CSID-derived dysphonia severity estimates in sustained vowels and connected speech across diverse diagnoses and severity levels and support the clinical utility of the CSID as an objective treatment outcomes measure.

PMID:
23809565
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvoice.2013.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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