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Bioarchitecture. 2013 Mar-Apr;3(2):25-37. doi: 10.4161/bioa.24966. Epub 2013 Jul 1.

Aged skeletal muscle retains the ability to fully regenerate functional architecture.

Author information

1
Neuromuscular and Regenerative Medicine Unit, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

While the general understanding of muscle regenerative capacity is that it declines with increasing age due to impairments in the number of muscle progenitor cells and interaction with their niche, studies vary in their model of choice, indices of myogenic repair, muscle of interest and duration of studies. We focused on the net outcome of regeneration, functional architecture, compared across three models of acute muscle injury to test the hypothesis that satellite cells maintain their capacity for effective myogenic regeneration with age. Muscle regeneration in extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) of young (3 mo-old), old (22 mo-old) and senescent female mice (28 mo-old) was evaluated for architectural features, fiber number and central nucleation, weight, collagen and fat deposition. The 3 injury paradigms were: a myotoxin (notexin) which leaves the blood vessels and nerves intact, freezing (FI) that damages local muscle, nerve and blood vessels and denervation-devascularization (DD) which dissociates the nerves and blood vessels from the whole muscle. Histological analyses revealed successful architectural regeneration following notexin injury with negligible fibrosis and fully restored function, regardless of age. In comparison, the regenerative response to injuries that damaged the neurovascular supply (FI and DD) was less effective, but similar across the ages. The focus on net regenerative outcome demonstrated that old and senescent muscle has a robust capacity to regenerate functional architecture.

KEYWORDS:

aging; contractility; fiber branching; progenitor cells; skeletal muscle

PMID:
23807088
PMCID:
PMC3715540
DOI:
10.4161/bioa.24966
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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