Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Biol Psychiatry. 2013 Dec 15;74(12):872-8. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.05.008. Epub 2013 Jun 24.

Zinc in depression: a meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Neuropsychopharmacology Research Group, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Zinc is an essential micronutrient with diverse biological roles in cell growth, apoptosis and metabolism, and in the regulation of endocrine, immune, and neuronal functions implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. This study sought to quantitatively summarize the clinical data comparing peripheral blood zinc concentrations between depressed and nondepressed subjects.

METHODS:

PubMed, Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO were searched for original peer-reviewed studies (to June 2012) measuring zinc concentrations in serum or plasma from depressed subjects (identified by either screening or clinical criteria) and nondepressed control subjects. Mean (±SD) zinc concentrations were extracted, combined quantitatively in random-effects meta-analysis, and summarized as a weighted mean difference (WMD).

RESULTS:

Seventeen studies, measuring peripheral blood zinc concentrations in 1643 depressed and 804 control subjects, were included. Zinc concentrations were approximately -1.85 µmol/L lower in depressed subjects than control subjects (95% confidence interval: [CI]: -2.51 to -1.19 µmol/L, Z17 = 5.45, p < .00001). Heterogeneity was detected (χ(2)17 = 142.81, p < .00001, I(2) = 88%) and explored; in studies that quantified depressive symptoms, greater depression severity was associated with greater relative zinc deficiency (B = -1.503, t9 = -2.82, p = .026). Effect sizes were numerically larger in studies of inpatients (WMD -2.543, 95% CI: -3.522 to -1.564, Z9 = 5.09, p < .0001) versus community samples (WMD -.943, 95% CI: -1.563 to -.323, Z7 = 2.98, p = .003) and in studies of higher methodological quality (WMD -2.354, 95% CI: -2.901 to -1.807, Z7 = 8.43, p < .0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Depression is associated with a lower concentration of zinc in peripheral blood. The pathophysiological relationships between zinc status and depression, and the potential benefits of zinc supplementation in depressed patients, warrant further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; depressive symptoms; major depressive disorder; micronutrient; trace metal; zinc

PMID:
23806573
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.05.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center