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Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2013 Aug;17(8):348. doi: 10.1007/s11916-013-0348-5.

Physiologic effects of dry needling.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185 3B3, 9000, Ghent, Belgium. barbara.cagnie@ugent.be

Abstract

During the past decades, worldwide clinical and scientific interest in dry needling (DN) therapy has grown exponentially. Various clinical effects have been credited to dry needling, but rigorous evidence about its potential physiological mechanisms of actions and effects is still lacking. Research identifying these exact mechanisms of dry needling action is sparse and studies performed in an acupuncture setting do not necessarily apply to DN. The studies of potential effects of DN are reviewed in reference to the different aspects involved in the pathophysiology of myofascial triggerpoints: the taut band, local ischemia and hypoxia, peripheral and central sensitization. This article aims to provide the physiotherapist with a greater understanding of the contemporary data available: what effects could be attributed to dry needling and what are their potential underlying mechanisms of action, and also indicate some directions at which future research could be aimed to fill current voids.

PMID:
23801002
DOI:
10.1007/s11916-013-0348-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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