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Pediatrics. 2013 Jul;132(1):e61-9.

Enrollment in early intervention programs among infants born late preterm, early term, and term.

Author information

1
Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the prevalence of and characteristics associated with early intervention (EI) program enrollment among infants born late preterm (34–36 weeks’ gestation), early term (37–38 weeks’ gestation), and term (39–41 weeks’ gestation).

METHODS:

A Massachusetts cohort of 554 974 singleton infants born during 1998 through 2005 and survived the neonatal period was followed until the third birthday of each infant. Data came from the Pregnancy to Early Life Longitudinal Data System that linked birth certificates, birth hospital discharge reports, death certificates, and EI program enrollment records. We calculated prevalence and adjusted risk ratios to compare differences and understand associations.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of EI program enrollment increased with each decreasing week of gestation before 41 weeks (late preterm [23.5%],early term [14.9%], and term [11.9%]. In adjusted analyses, the strongest predictors of EI enrollment (adjusted risk ratio ≥1.20) for all gestational age groups were male gender, having a congenital anomaly, and having mothers who were ≥40 years old, non high school graduates, and recipients of public insurance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Infants born late preterm and early term have higher prevalence of EI program services enrollment than infants born at term,and may benefit from more frequent monitoring for developmental delays or disabilities.

PMID:
23796745
PMCID:
PMC4407274
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2012-3121
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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