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BMJ Open. 2013 May 28;3(5). pii: e003067. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003067.

Clinical implementation of a new antibiotic prophylaxis regimen for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

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1
Unit of Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study was undertaken to test the extent to which a new antibiotic prophylaxis regimen for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), identified as a justified and simpler alternative to conventional regimen in a randomised clinical trial, has been adopted in clinical practice.

DESIGN:

A Swedish nationwide implementation survey, conducted in February 2013, assessed the level of clinical implementation of a 20 ml dose of oral solution of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim deposited in the PEG catheter immediately after insertion. All hospitals inserting at least five PEGs annually were identified from the Swedish Patient Registry. A clinician involved in the PEG insertions at each hospital participated in a structured telephone interview addressing their routine use of antibiotic prophylaxis.

SETTING:

All Swedish hospitals inserting PEGs (n=60).

PARTICIPANTS:

Representatives of PEG insertions at each of the 60 eligible hospitals participated (100% participation).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Use of routine antibiotic prophylaxis for PEG.

RESULTS:

A total of 32 (53%) of the 60 hospitals had adopted the new regimen. It was more frequently adopted in university hospitals (67%) than in community hospitals (41%). An annual total of 1813 (70%) of 2573 patients received the new regimen. Higher annual hospital volume was associated with a higher level of adoption of the new regimen (80% in the highest vs 31% in the lowest).

CONCLUSIONS:

The clinical implementation of the new antibiotic prophylaxis regimen for PEG was high and rapid (70% of all patients within 3 years), particularly in large hospitals.

KEYWORDS:

NUTRITION & DIETETICS; SURGERY

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