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J Vis Exp. 2013 Jun 16;(76):e50363. doi: 10.3791/50363.

A novel high-resolution in vivo imaging technique to study the dynamic response of intracranial structures to tumor growth and therapeutics.

Author information

1
Brain Tumor Research Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto Medical Discovery Tower. Kelly.burrell@sickkids.ca

Abstract

We have successfully integrated previously established Intracranial window (ICW) technology (1-4) with intravital 2-photon confocal microscopy to develop a novel platform that allows for direct long-term visualization of tissue structure changes intracranially. Imaging at a single cell resolution in a real-time fashion provides supplementary dynamic information beyond that provided by standard end-point histological analysis, which looks solely at 'snap-shot' cross sections of tissue. Establishing this intravital imaging technique in fluorescent chimeric mice, we are able to image four fluorescent channels simultaneously. By incorporating fluorescently labeled cells, such as GFP+ bone marrow, it is possible to track the fate of these cells studying their long-term migration, integration and differentiation within tissue. Further integration of a secondary reporter cell, such as an mCherry glioma tumor line, allows for characterization of cell:cell interactions. Structural changes in the tissue microenvironment can be highlighted through the addition of intra-vital dyes and antibodies, for example CD31 tagged antibodies and Dextran molecules. Moreover, we describe the combination of our ICW imaging model with a small animal micro-irradiator that provides stereotactic irradiation, creating a platform through which the dynamic tissue changes that occur following the administration of ionizing irradiation can be assessed. Current limitations of our model include penetrance of the microscope, which is limited to a depth of up to 900 μm from the sub cortical surface, limiting imaging to the dorsal axis of the brain. The presence of the skull bone makes the ICW a more challenging technical procedure, compared to the more established and utilized chamber models currently used to study mammary tissue and fat pads (5-7). In addition, the ICW provides many challenges when optimizing the imaging.

PMID:
23793043
PMCID:
PMC3727480
DOI:
10.3791/50363
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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