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J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Jul;55(7):732-40. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182954080.

Examining individual factors according to health risk appraisal data as determinants of absenteeism among US utility employees.

Author information

1
Health Management Research Center, School of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, USA. mmarzec@umich.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate predictors of absenteeism and discuss potential implications for policy/program design.

METHODS:

Health Risk Appraisal (HRA) data and self-reported and objective absenteeism (personnel records) were used to develop a structural equation model, controlling for age, sex, and job classification. A Medical Condition Burden Index (MCBI) was created by summing the number of self-reported medical conditions.

RESULTS:

Higher MCBI and stress were direct predictors of absenteeism. Physical activity was not associated with absenteeism but mediated both stress and MCBI.

CONCLUSIONS:

Because stress impacted both absenteeism and MCBI, organizations may benefit by placing stress management as a priority for wellness program and policy focus. Physical activity was not directly associated with absenteeism but was a mediating variable for stress and MCBI. Measures of stress and physical health may be more meaningful as outcome measures for physical activity programs than absenteeism.

PMID:
23787561
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182954080
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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