Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Dermatol Pract Concept. 2013 Apr 30;3(2):3-7. doi: 10.5826/dpc.0302a02. Print 2013 Apr.

Cutaneous horns: clues to invasive squamous cell carcinoma being present in the horn base.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cutaneous horns usually develop on a keratinocytic base with the histopathology on a spectrum ranging from benign keratosis through to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Some features of horns are easily identified using dermatoscopy.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate if specific clinical or dermatoscopy features of horns correlate with the histopathology in the base of the horn.

METHODS:

Consecutive horn cases (n=163) were assessed prospectively in vivo for horn height, terrace morphology and base erythema using a Heine Delta 20 dermatoscope. Cases with potentially confounding influences were excluded. A history of horn pain or pain on palpation was also recorded.

RESULTS:

Benign keratosis (n = 49), actinic keratosis (n = 21), SCC in situ (n = 37) and invasive SCC (n = 56) were recorded. An invasive SCC presenting as a horn as most likely to have a height less than the base diameter, 66% (37/56). Compared to the other study entities, invasive SCC tends to have less terrace morphology (P<0.05), a higher incidence of base erythema (P<0.05) and more pain (P<0.01).

LIMITATIONS:

Data categories did not include anatomic site or horn growth rates. Excision selection bias favored the incidence of invasive SCC.

CONCLUSIONS:

Horns presenting on an invasive SCC base are more likely to have a height less than the diameter of the base, not to have terrace morphology, to have an erythematous base and to be painful.

KEYWORDS:

cutaneous horn; pain; squamous cell carcinoma

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center