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Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;43(4):1040-53. doi: 10.1093/ije/dyt064. Epub 2013 Jun 19.

Cohort profile: The men androgen inflammation lifestyle environment and stress (MAILES) study.

Author information

1
Population Research and Outcomes Studies, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men's Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, The Health Observatory, The University of Adelaide, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia, Australia, School of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, School of Pharmacy & Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, Department of Geographical and Environmental Studies, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia and School of Medicine, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
2
Population Research and Outcomes Studies, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men's Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, The Health Observatory, The University of Adelaide, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia, Australia, School of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, School of Pharmacy & Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, Department of Geographical and Environmental Studies, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia and School of Medicine, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia gary.wittert@adelaide.edu.au.

Abstract

The Men Androgen Inflammation Lifestyle Environment and Stress (MAILES) Study was established in 2009 to investigate the associations of sex steroids, inflammation, environmental and psychosocial factors with cardio-metabolic disease risk in men. The study population consists of 2569 men from the harmonisation of two studies: all participants of the Florey Adelaide Male Ageing Study (FAMAS) and eligible male participants of the North West Adelaide Health Study (NWAHS). The cohort has so far participated in three stages of the MAILES Study: MAILES1 (FAMAS Wave 1, from 2002-2005, and NWAHS Wave 2, from 2004-2006); MAILES2 (FAMAS Wave 2, from 2007-2010, and NWAHS Wave 3, from 2008-2010); and MAILES3 (a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) survey of all participants in the study, conducted in 2010). Data have been collected on a comprehensive range of physical, psychosocial and demographic issues relating to a number of chronic conditions (including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, arthritis and mental health) and health-related risk factors (including obesity, blood pressure, smoking, diet, alcohol intake and inflammatory markers), as well as on current and past health status and medication.

KEYWORDS:

Men; chronic disease; cohort studies; longitudinal studies; risk factors

PMID:
23785097
PMCID:
PMC4258764
DOI:
10.1093/ije/dyt064
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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