Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 May;21(5):910-7. doi: 10.1002/oby.20167.

Predicting the effects of a high-energy diet on fatty liver and hippocampal-dependent memory in male rats.

Author information

1
Neuroscience Institute, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In rodents, diets exceeding nutritional requirements (i.e., high-energy diets; HED) impair hippocampal-dependent memory. Our research suggests that the effects likely involve HED-induced increases in liver lipids. In this experiment, rats were provided with diet choices to test whether voluntary consumption of a HED impairs spatial memory, whether differences in initial weight gain predict memory deficits, and whether increases in liver lipids are associated with the memory deficits.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were given a control diet or cafeteria-style HED for 8 weeks. Weight gain during the first 5 days on the diet was used to divide rats into a HED-Lean group and a HED-Obese group. Spatial water maze memory was tested 8 weeks later and postmortem liver lipid concentrations were quantified.

RESULTS:

Compared with the HED-Lean and control rats, the HED-Obese rats had impaired spatial memory and met the human diagnostic criterion of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (>5% liver lipids relative to liver weight). Moreover, liver lipids were correlated with memory deficits.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings show that voluntary consumption of a HED impairs memory, that initial weight gain predicts fatty liver and memory deficits, and that fatty liver may contribute to the memory-impairing effects of obesity.

PMID:
23784893
PMCID:
PMC3695417
DOI:
10.1002/oby.20167
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center