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Mol Psychiatry. 2014 Jun;19(6):659-67. doi: 10.1038/mp.2013.78. Epub 2013 Jun 18.

The autism brain imaging data exchange: towards a large-scale evaluation of the intrinsic brain architecture in autism.

Author information

1
Phyllis Green and Randolph Cowen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience at the NYU Child Study Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
2
Nathan S Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA.
3
Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY, USA.
4
1] Phyllis Green and Randolph Cowen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience at the NYU Child Study Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA [2] Nathan S Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA.
5
1] Phyllis Green and Randolph Cowen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience at the NYU Child Study Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA [2] KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
6
1] Division of Neuroradiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA [2] Interdepartmental Program in Neuroscience, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA [3] The Brain Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA [4] Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
7
1] Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Institute of Living at Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USA [2] Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
8
1] Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA [2] Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA [3] Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA [4] David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
9
1] Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA [2] Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA [3] Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
10
1] Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA [2] Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA.
11
Department of Psychiatry and Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, UK.
12
1] Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA [2] Psychology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheba, Israel.
13
Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Munich, Germany.
14
Behavioral Neuroscience and Psychiatry Departments, and Advanced Imaging Research Center, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
15
1] Division of Humanities and Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA [2] Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA.
16
Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.
17
1] Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Dutch Academy of Science (KNAW), Amsterdam, The Netherlands [2] BCN NeuroImaging Center, University Medical Center Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
18
1] Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA [2] Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA.
19
Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.
20
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
21
Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
22
Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
23
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
24
Laboratory for Neurocognitive and Imaging Research, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA.
25
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
26
Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
27
1] Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA [2] Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA [3] David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA [4] Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
28
Translational MRI, University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Leuven, Belgium.
29
Division of Biology, Caltech, Pasadena, CA, USA.
30
KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
31
1] Laboratory for Neurocognitive and Imaging Research, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA [2] Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
32
1] Nathan S Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA [2] Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) represent a formidable challenge for psychiatry and neuroscience because of their high prevalence, lifelong nature, complexity and substantial heterogeneity. Facing these obstacles requires large-scale multidisciplinary efforts. Although the field of genetics has pioneered data sharing for these reasons, neuroimaging had not kept pace. In response, we introduce the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE)-a grassroots consortium aggregating and openly sharing 1112 existing resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) data sets with corresponding structural MRI and phenotypic information from 539 individuals with ASDs and 573 age-matched typical controls (TCs; 7-64 years) (http://fcon_1000.

PROJECTS:

nitrc.org/indi/abide/). Here, we present this resource and demonstrate its suitability for advancing knowledge of ASD neurobiology based on analyses of 360 male subjects with ASDs and 403 male age-matched TCs. We focused on whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity and also survey a range of voxel-wise measures of intrinsic functional brain architecture. Whole-brain analyses reconciled seemingly disparate themes of both hypo- and hyperconnectivity in the ASD literature; both were detected, although hypoconnectivity dominated, particularly for corticocortical and interhemispheric functional connectivity. Exploratory analyses using an array of regional metrics of intrinsic brain function converged on common loci of dysfunction in ASDs (mid- and posterior insula and posterior cingulate cortex), and highlighted less commonly explored regions such as the thalamus. The survey of the ABIDE R-fMRI data sets provides unprecedented demonstrations of both replication and novel discovery. By pooling multiple international data sets, ABIDE is expected to accelerate the pace of discovery setting the stage for the next generation of ASD studies.

PMID:
23774715
PMCID:
PMC4162310
DOI:
10.1038/mp.2013.78
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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