Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Res Dev Disabil. 2013 Sep;34(9):2717-24. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2013.05.036. Epub 2013 Jun 14.

Componential deconstruction of infant distress vocalizations via tree-based models: a study of cry in autism spectrum disorder and typical development.

Author information

1
RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Unit for Affiliative Social Behavior, Japan. gesposito@brain.riken.jp

Abstract

Understanding early episodes of cry is essential to improve caregiver-child interaction and child well-being. Caregiver perceptions of cry are based on interpretations of different acoustic characteristics of the cry, including the length of the pauses, the number of utterances, and the fundamental frequency. In this study, we used tree-based models to establish a hierarchy of effect in terms of how these acoustic characteristics influence perceptions of cries of children with autism compared to cries of typically developing children. In two studies, one in Italy and the other in Japan, we found that cries of children with autism are perceived more negatively. We also found that the length of the pauses, more than the number of utterances or fundamental frequency, determines listeners' negative perceptions. Implications for early caregiver-child interactions are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Autism; Autistic disorder; Cry; Perception; Perception of cry in Japan; Tree-based models

PMID:
23774058
PMCID:
PMC3741341
DOI:
10.1016/j.ridd.2013.05.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center