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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013 Aug;101(2):164-9. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2013.05.005. Epub 2013 Jun 14.

Clinical predictors and significance of postvoid residual volume in women with diabetes.

Author information

1
University of California, San Francisco, United States. ayesha.appa@ucsf.edu

Abstract

AIMS:

To identify women with diabetes at risk of increased postvoid residual volume (PVR) and investigate the relationship of increased PVR to urinary symptoms in women with diabetes.

METHODS:

PVR was measured by bladder ultrasonography in a cross-sectional cohort of 427 middle-aged and older women with diabetes. Participants completed questionnaires assessing urgency incontinence, stress incontinence, daytime frequency, nocturia, obstructive voiding, and diabetes-related end-organ complications: heart disease, stroke, neuropathy. Serum HbA1c and creatinine were recorded.

RESULTS:

75% of participants had a PVR of 0-49, 13% had a PVR of 50-99, and 12% had a PVR ≥ 100 mL. Approximately 59% of women with a PVR < 50 mL reported at least one lower urinary tract symptom. Women with diabetes and a PVR ≥ 100 mL were more likely to report urgency incontinence (OR 2.18, CI 1.08-4.41) and obstructive voiding symptoms (OR 2.47, CI 1.18-5.17) than women with PVR < 50 mL. In multivariable models, poorer glycemic control was associated with an increased likelihood of PVR ≥ 100 mL (OR 1.30, CI 1.06-1.59 per 1.0-U increase in HbA1c).

CONCLUSIONS:

PVR volumes ≥ 100 mL may indicate increased risk of urgency incontinence and obstructive voiding. Glycemic control may play a role in preventing increased PVR in women with diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes mellitus complication; Female urogenital disease; Urinary incontinence

PMID:
23773505
PMCID:
PMC3742560
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2013.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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