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Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;43(4):1021-30. doi: 10.1093/ije/dyt065. Epub 2013 Jun 14.

Cohort profile: The study of respiratory pathogens in Andean children.

Author information

1
Departments of Preventive Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Pediatrics-Division of Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Instituto de Investigación Nutricional, Lima, Perú, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland and Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta GA, USA Carlos.grijalva@vanderbilt.edu.
2
Departments of Preventive Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Pediatrics-Division of Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Instituto de Investigación Nutricional, Lima, Perú, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland and Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta GA, USA.
3
Departments of Preventive Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Pediatrics-Division of Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Instituto de Investigación Nutricional, Lima, Perú, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland and Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta GA, USADepartments of Preventive Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Pediatrics-Division of Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville TN, USA, Instituto de Investigación Nutricional, Lima, Perú, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland and Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta GA, USA.

Abstract

We investigated respiratory pathogens in a prospective cohort study of young children living in the Peruvian Andes. In the study we assessed viral respiratory infections among young children, and explored interactions of viruses with common respiratory bacteria, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae. Through weekly household visits, data were collected on the signs and symptoms of acute respiratory illness (ARI), nasal samples were collected to test for viruses during episodes of ARI, and nasopharyngeal samples were collected on a monthly basis to monitor bacterial colonisation. We also collected data on vaccination coverage, patterns of social mixing, geographic information, and environmental and socio-demographic variables. Understanding the interaction of respiratory viruses with bacteria and its impact on the burden and severity of ARIs in rural areas of developing countries is critical to designing strategies for preventing such infections.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; acute respiratory illness; children; influenza; pneumococcus

PMID:
23771719
PMCID:
PMC4121548
DOI:
10.1093/ije/dyt065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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