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Clin Neurophysiol. 2013 Aug;124(8):1507-16. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2012.11.016. Epub 2013 Jun 12.

Continuous High Frequency Activity: a peculiar SEEG pattern related to specific brain regions.

Author information

1
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. f.melani@meyer.it

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

While visually marking the high frequency oscillations in the stereo-EEG of epileptic patients, we observed a continuous/semicontinuous activity in the ripple band (80-250 Hz), which we defined continuous High Frequency Activity (HFA). We aim to analyze in all brain regions the occurrence and significance of this particular pattern.

METHODS:

Twenty patients implanted in mesial temporal and neocortical areas were studied. One minute of slow-wave sleep was reviewed. The background was classified as continuous/semicontinuous, irregular, or sporadic based on the duration of the fast oscillations. Each channel was classified as inside/outside the seizure onset zone (SOZ) or a lesion.

RESULTS:

The continuous/semicontinuous HFA occurred in 54 of the 790 channels analyzed, with a clearly higher prevalence in hippocampus and occipital lobe. No correlation was found with the SOZ or lesions. In the occipital lobe the continuous/semicontinuous HFA was present independently of whether eyes were open or closed.

CONCLUSIONS:

We describe what appears to be a new physiological High Frequency Activity, independent of epileptogenicity, present almost exclusively in the hippocampus and occipital cortex but independent of the alpha rhythm.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The continuous HFA may be an intrinsic characteristic of specific brain regions, reflecting a particular type of physiological neuronal activity.

KEYWORDS:

HFOs; High Frequency Activity; Intracerebral electrodes; Neocortical regions; SEEG

PMID:
23768436
PMCID:
PMC4490899
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2012.11.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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