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Clin Cancer Res. 2013 Aug 1;19(15):4239-48. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-0071. Epub 2013 Jun 13.

Vandetanib in children and adolescents with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B associated medullary thyroid carcinoma.

Author information

1
Division of Oncology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. foxe@email.chop.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a manifestation of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) syndromes caused by germline, activating mutations in the RET (REarranged during Transfection) proto-oncogene. Vandetanib, a VEGF and EGF receptor inhibitor, blocks RET tyrosine kinase activity and is active in adults with hereditary MTC.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

We conducted a phase I/II trial of vandetanib for children (5-12 years) and adolescents (13-18 years) with MTC to define a recommended dose and assess antitumor activity. The starting dose was 100 mg/m(2) administered orally, once daily, continuously for 28-day treatment cycles. The dose could be escalated to 150 mg/m(2)/d after two cycles. Radiographic response to vandetanib was quantified using RECIST (v1.0), biomarker response was measured by comparing posttreatment serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels to baseline, and a patient-reported outcome was used to assess clinical benefit.

RESULTS:

Sixteen patients with locally advanced or metastatic MTC received vandetanib for a median (range) 27 (2-52) cycles. Eleven patients remain on protocol therapy. Diarrhea was the primary dose-limiting toxicity. In subjects with M918T RET germline mutations (n = 15) the confirmed objective partial response rate was 47% (exact 95% confidence intervals, 21%-75%). Biomarker partial response was confirmed for calcitonin in 12 subjects and for CEA in 8 subjects.

CONCLUSION:

Using an innovative trial design and selecting patients based on target gene expression, we conclude that vandetanib 100 mg/m(2)/d is a well-tolerated and highly active new treatment for children and adolescents with MEN2B and locally advanced or metastatic MTC.

PMID:
23766359
PMCID:
PMC4274128
DOI:
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-0071
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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