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J Affect Disord. 2013 Sep 5;150(2):430-40. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2013.04.036. Epub 2013 Jun 12.

Verbal episodic memory deficits in remitted bipolar patients: a combined behavioural and fMRI study.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Neuroimaging, Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany. viola.Oertel@kgu.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Episodic memory deficits affect the majority of patients with bipolar disorder (BD).

AIMS:

The study investigates episodic memory performance through different approaches, including behavioural measures, physiological parameters, and the underlying functional activation patterns with functional neuroimaging (fMRI).

METHODS:

26 Remitted BD patients and a matched group of healthy controls underwent a verbal episodic memory test together with monitored autonomic response, psychopathological ratings and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the verbal episodic memory test.

RESULTS:

Compared to healthy controls, BD patients performed significantly worse during the episodic memory task. The results further indicate that verbal episodic memory deficits in BD are associated with abnormal functional activity patterns in frontal, occipital and limbic regions, and an increase in stress parameters.

LIMITATIONS:

We aimed to minimise sample heterogeneity by setting clear criteria for remission, based on the scores of a depression (BDI II) and mania scale (BRMAS) and on the DSM IV criteria. However, our patients were not symptom-free and scored higher on BDI II scores than the control group.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results are of interest for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in BD patients, as persistent cognitive impairment may hamper full rehabilitation.

KEYWORDS:

Bipolar disorders; Cognitive performance; Episodic memory; Neuroimaging; fMRI

PMID:
23764381
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2013.04.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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