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Am J Public Health. 2013 Aug;103(8):1428-35. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2012.301182. Epub 2013 Jun 13.

Prevalence of anogenital warts among participants in private health plans in the United States, 2003-2010: potential impact of human papillomavirus vaccination.

Author information

1
Division of STD Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MS E-02, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. eflagg@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We estimated anogenital wart prevalence from 2003 to 2010 by gender and age group in a large US cohort with private insurance to detect potential decreases among people most likely to be affected by human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination.

METHODS:

We restricted health care claims to those from individuals aged 10 to 39 years with continuous insurance within a given year. We derived anogenital wart diagnoses from a diagnosis of condyloma acuminata, or either a less specific viral wart diagnosis or genital wart medication combined with either a benign anogenital neoplasm or destruction or excision of a noncervical anogenital lesion.

RESULTS:

Prevalence increased slightly in 2003 to 2006, then significantly declined in 2007 to 2010 among girls aged 15 to 19 years; increased in 2003 to 2007, remained level through 2009, and declined in 2010 among women aged 20 to 24 years; and increased through 2009 but not in 2010 for women aged 25 to 39 years. For males aged 15 to 39 years, prevalence for each 5-year age group increased in 2003 to 2009, but no increases were observed for 2010.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data indicate reductions in anogenital warts among US females aged 15 to 24 years, the age group most likely to be affected by introduction of the HPV vaccine.

PMID:
23763409
PMCID:
PMC4007878
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2012.301182
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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