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PLoS One. 2013 Jun 10;8(6):e56330. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0056330. Print 2013.

Novel biodegradable porous scaffold applied to skin regeneration.

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1
Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Erratum in

  • PLoS One. 2013;8(11). doi:10.1371/annotation/4d5ef06d-b800-4d0c-b809-d3cb7a5d00c6. Wang, Zhao-Ren [corrected to Wang, Chau-Zen].

Abstract

Skin wound healing is an important lifesaving issue for massive lesions. A novel porous scaffold with collagen, hyaluronic acid and gelatin was developed for skin wound repair. The swelling ratio of this developed scaffold was assayed by water absorption capacity and showed a value of over 20 g water/g dried scaffold. The scaffold was then degraded in time- and dose-dependent manners by three enzymes: lysozyme, hyaluronidase and collagenase I. The average pore diameter of the scaffold was 132.5±8.4 µm measured from SEM images. With human skin cells growing for 7 days, the SEM images showed surface fractures on the scaffold due to enzymatic digestion, indicating the biodegradable properties of this scaffold. To simulate skin distribution, the human epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts were seeded on the porous scaffold and the cross-section immunofluorescent staining demonstrated normal human skin layer distributions. The collagen amount was also quantified after skin cells seeding and presented an amount 50% higher than those seeded on culture wells. The in vivo histological results showed that the scaffold ameliorated wound healing, including decreasing neutrophil infiltrates and thickening newly generated skin compared to the group without treatments.

PMID:
23762223
PMCID:
PMC3677897
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0056330
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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