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PLoS One. 2013 Jun 3;8(6):e64729. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0064729. Print 2014.

Serum resistin, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Research Unit of Diabetes and Endocrine Diseases, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. c.menzaghi@operapadrepio.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

High serum resistin has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the general population, Only sparse and conflicting results, limited to Asian individuals, have been reported, so far, in type 2 diabetes. We studied the role of serum resistin on coronary artery disease, major cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

We tested the association of circulating resistin concentrations with coronary artery disease, major cardiovascular events (cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and non-fatal stroke) and all-cause mortality in 2,313 diabetic patients of European ancestry from two cross-sectional and two prospective studies. In addition, the expression of resistin gene (RETN) was measured in blood cells of 68 diabetic patients and correlated with their serum resistin levels.

RESULTS:

In a model comprising age, sex, smoking habits, BMI, HbA1c, and insulin, antihypertensive and antidyslipidemic therapies, serum resistin was associated with coronary artery disease in both cross-sectional studies: OR (95%CI) per SD increment = 1.35 (1.10-1.64) and 1.99 (1.55-2.55). Additionally, serum resistin predicted incident major cardiovascular events (HR per SD increment = 1.31; 1.10-1.56) and all-cause mortality (HR per SD increment = 1.16; 1.06-1.26). Adjusting also for fibrinogen levels affected the association with coronary artery disease and incident cardiovascular events, but not that with all cause-mortality. Finally, serum resistin was positively correlated with RETN mRNA expression (rho = 0.343).

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first study showing that high serum resistin (a likely consequence, at least partly, of increased RETN expression) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in diabetic patients of European ancestry.

PMID:
23755138
PMCID:
PMC3670852
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0064729
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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