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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Jun 18;110 Suppl 2:10430-7. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1301228110. Epub 2013 Jun 10.

From perception to pleasure: music and its neural substrates.

Author information

1
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. robert.zatorre@mcgill.ca

Abstract

Music has existed in human societies since prehistory, perhaps because it allows expression and regulation of emotion and evokes pleasure. In this review, we present findings from cognitive neuroscience that bear on the question of how we get from perception of sound patterns to pleasurable responses. First, we identify some of the auditory cortical circuits that are responsible for encoding and storing tonal patterns and discuss evidence that cortical loops between auditory and frontal cortices are important for maintaining musical information in working memory and for the recognition of structural regularities in musical patterns, which then lead to expectancies. Second, we review evidence concerning the mesolimbic striatal system and its involvement in reward, motivation, and pleasure in other domains. Recent data indicate that this dopaminergic system mediates pleasure associated with music; specifically, reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the nucleus accumbens, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. We propose that pleasure in music arises from interactions between cortical loops that enable predictions and expectancies to emerge from sound patterns and subcortical systems responsible for reward and valuation.

KEYWORDS:

auditory cortex; cognition; functional imaging

PMID:
23754373
PMCID:
PMC3690607
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1301228110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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