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Prev Med. 2013 Dec;57(6):920-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.05.028. Epub 2013 Jun 6.

The impact of implementing a public bicycle share program on the likelihood of collisions and near misses in Montreal, Canada.

Author information

1
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, University of Saskatchewan, Health Sciences Building, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5, Canada. Electronic address: dlf545@mail.usask.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to estimate the impact of implementing a public bicycle share program (PBSP) on the likelihood of self-reported collisions and near misses between cyclists and motor vehicles among cyclists living in Montreal.

METHODS:

A repeated cross sectional design was used. Surveys were conducted at the launch of the PBSP, at the end of the first and second seasons of implementation. Logistic regression estimated changes in the likelihood of reporting collisions or near misses.

RESULTS:

There was no evidence of a change in likelihood of reporting a collision or near miss after implementing the PBSP. PBSP users were not at a greater risk of reporting a collision (OR=1.53, 95% CI: 0.77-3.02) or near miss (OR=1.37, 95% CI: 0.94-1.98), although confidence intervals were wide. The number of days of cycling per week was associated with collisions (OR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.39) and near misses (OR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.26-1.42).

CONCLUSIONS:

There was no evidence of a change in the likelihood of reporting collisions or near misses in Montreal between the implementation of the PBSP and the end of the second season. Time spent cycling was associated with reporting a collision or near miss.

KEYWORDS:

Collisions; Cycling; Injuries; Intervention; Population health

PMID:
23747355
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.05.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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