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Cell. 2013 Jun 6;153(6):1219-1227. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.05.002.

Dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult humans.

Author information

1
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Institut Camille Jordan, CNRS UMR 5208, University of Lyon, Villeurbanne, France.
4
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, Uppsala University, SE-751 20, Sweden.
5
Department of Neurology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen, Germany.
6
Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., L-397, Livermore, CA, USA.
7
Department of Neurology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.
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Contributed equally

Abstract

Adult-born hippocampal neurons are important for cognitive plasticity in rodents. There is evidence for hippocampal neurogenesis in adult humans, although whether its extent is sufficient to have functional significance has been questioned. We have assessed the generation of hippocampal cells in humans by measuring the concentration of nuclear-bomb-test-derived ¹⁴C in genomic DNA, and we present an integrated model of the cell turnover dynamics. We found that a large subpopulation of hippocampal neurons constituting one-third of the neurons is subject to exchange. In adult humans, 700 new neurons are added in each hippocampus per day, corresponding to an annual turnover of 1.75% of the neurons within the renewing fraction, with a modest decline during aging. We conclude that neurons are generated throughout adulthood and that the rates are comparable in middle-aged humans and mice, suggesting that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to human brain function.

PMID:
23746839
PMCID:
PMC4394608
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2013.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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