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J Acoust Soc Am. 2013 Jun;133(6):4279-89. doi: 10.1121/1.4803910.

The role of first formant information in simulated electro-acoustic hearing.

Author information

1
Hearing and Balance Centre, Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO16 7ES, United Kingdom. cav@isvr.soton.ac.uk

Abstract

Cochlear implant (CI) recipients with residual hearing show improved performance with the addition of low-frequency acoustic stimulation (electro-acoustic stimulation, EAS). The present study sought to determine whether a synthesized first formant (F1) signal provided benefit to speech recognition in simulated EAS hearing and to compare such benefit with that from other low-frequency signals. A further aim was to determine if F1 amplitude or frequency was more important in determining benefit and if F1 benefit varied with formant bandwidth. In two experiments, sentence recordings from a male speaker were processed via a simulation of a partial insertion CI, and presented to normal hearing listeners in combination with various low-frequency signals, including a tone tracking fundamental frequency (F0), low-pass filtered speech, and signals based on F1 estimation. A simulated EAS benefit was found with F1 signals, and was similar to the benefit from F0 or low-pass filtered speech. The benefit did not differ significantly with the narrowing or widening of the F1 bandwidth. The benefit from low-frequency envelope signals was significantly less than the benefit from any low-frequency signal containing fine frequency information. Results indicate that F1 provides a benefit in simulated EAS hearing but low frequency envelope information is less important than low frequency fine structure in determining such benefit.

PMID:
23742378
DOI:
10.1121/1.4803910
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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