Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Med Res Opin. 2013 Sep;29(9):1075-82. doi: 10.1185/03007995.2013.812034. Epub 2013 Jun 21.

Association between molecular monitoring and long-term outcomes in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients treated with first line imatinib.

Author information

1
John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Molecular monitoring using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts using the international scale (IS) is recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and the European LeukemiaNet for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). This study assessed the impact of the frequency of qPCR testing on progression-free survival (PFS).

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

This retrospective chart review of 402 CML-CP patients on first line imatinib therapy, performed by 38 community-based US physicians, analyzed the impact of the frequency of molecular monitoring on the risk of progression and PFS.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Time to progression and progression-free survival.

RESULTS:

Over the 3 year study, 13.2% of patients did not have any qPCR monitoring and 46.3% had 3-4 qPCR tests per year; 5.7% of CML-CP patients progressed to accelerated/blast phase or died. Compared to patients with no qPCR monitoring, those with 3-4 qPCR tests per year had a lower risk of progression (HR = 0.085; p = 0.001) and longer PFS (HR = 0.088; p = 0.001) after adjusting for potential confounders, as did those patients with 1-2 qPCR tests per year (both p < 0.02). Results were consistent after adjusting for Sokal score when available.

CONCLUSION:

This is the first study to document the clinical impact of frequent molecular monitoring, and the findings underscore the importance of regular molecular monitoring in delivering quality care for CML. These findings could be subject to unobserved confounders.

PMID:
23738923
DOI:
10.1185/03007995.2013.812034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Taylor & Francis
    Loading ...
    Support Center