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ISRN Psychiatry. 2012 Jan 3;2012:432321. doi: 10.5402/2012/432321. Print 2012.

Factors Associated with Anxiety and Depression among African American and White Women.

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1
Department of Urban Planning and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago, 412 S. Peoria, Room 215, MC 348, Chicago, IL 60607, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We examined factors associated with depression and anxiety in a cohort of low-income Baltimore women.

METHODS:

We used Pathways to Adulthood data, a cohort of adults aged 27 to 33 who were born in Baltimore between 1960 and 1965. Our outcomes were a score of >4 on the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) across the depression or anxiety domains. Linear regression clustered on census tract was used for multivariate analysis.

RESULTS:

In multivariable analyses, unmarried women, White women, those with lower self-rated health, and younger mothers had higher depression scores. Only lower self-rated health and White race were associated with a higher anxiety score. Neither neighborhood poverty nor racial composition was a predictor for anxiety or depression; however, the significant risk factors cluster in disadvantaged neighborhoods.

CONCLUSION:

Our work highlights the importance of universal screening for depression or anxiety with more in-depth surveillance based on risk factors rather than on race.

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