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Curr Opin Cardiol. 2013 Jul;28(4):389-98. doi: 10.1097/HCO.0b013e328362059d.

Recent clinical trials evaluating benefit of drug therapy for modification of HDL cholesterol.

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1
Division of Cardiology, Mayo Clinic, Minnesota 55905, USA. wright.scott@mayo.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

To highlight the recent data evaluating pharmacological manipulation of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and examine whether medication-induced changes were associated with improved clinical outcomes and reduced short-term and long-term cardiovascular risks. The review focuses on the studies with niacin and the new cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors torcetrapib, dalcetrapib, anacetrapib and evacetrapib.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Several large randomized clinical trials have evaluated drug therapy on HDL-C and cardiovascular outcomes. Two studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes following HDL-C raising with niacin. Data from the Heart Protection 2 Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events and The Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health trials both demonstrated no clinical benefit from use of niacin therapy when added to background statin therapy with regard to short-term and long-term cardiovascular risk reduction. Both studies demonstrated excess side-effects from use of niacin. A number of clinical trials have evaluated HDL-C modification from use of a CETP inhibitor. All of the studies have demonstrated significant increases in HDL-C. To date, the outcome data are not favorable. Use of torcetrapib was associated with excess mortality. Use of dalcetrapib had no effect on short-term and long-term cardiovascular events. Two outcome studies with anacetrapib and evacetrapib are ongoing and will report out in a few years' time.

SUMMARY:

Pharmacological manipulation of HDL-C has not improved the cardiovascular outcomes. Several agents have caused harm or unacceptable side-effects. Further studies are needed before one can recommend the use of additional lipid-modifying therapies beyond statins.

PMID:
23736814
DOI:
10.1097/HCO.0b013e328362059d
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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