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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Jun 18;110(25):10135-40. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1222447110. Epub 2013 Jun 3.

Marital satisfaction and break-ups differ across on-line and off-line meeting venues.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Cacioppo@uchicago.edu

Abstract

Marital discord is costly to children, families, and communities. The advent of the Internet, social networking, and on-line dating has affected how people meet future spouses, but little is known about the prevalence or outcomes of these marriages or the demographics of those involved. We addressed these questions in a nationally representative sample of 19,131 respondents who married between 2005 and 2012. Results indicate that more than one-third of marriages in America now begin on-line. In addition, marriages that began on-line, when compared with those that began through traditional off-line venues, were slightly less likely to result in a marital break-up (separation or divorce) and were associated with slightly higher marital satisfaction among those respondents who remained married. Demographic differences were identified between respondents who met their spouse through on-line vs. traditional off-line venues, but the findings for marital break-up and marital satisfaction remained significant after statistically controlling for these differences. These data suggest that the Internet may be altering the dynamics and outcomes of marriage itself.

KEYWORDS:

dyads; marital outcomes; social relationships

PMID:
23733955
PMCID:
PMC3690854
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1222447110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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