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Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Jul 6;169(2):211-5. doi: 10.1530/EJE-13-0205. Print 2013 Aug.

Neurodegenerative and inflammatory biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid in patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission.

Author information

1
Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden. oskar.ragnarsson@medic.gu.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) in long-term remission have impaired cognitive function. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers are important diagnostic tools in the work-up of patients with cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to analyze neurodegenerative and inflammatory biomarkers in the CSF of patients with CS in remission.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional, single-center study.

PATIENTS:

Twelve women previously treated for CS and six healthy subjects.

MEASUREMENTS:

Neurodegenerative CSF markers: total tau, hyperphosphorylated tau, amyloid beta peptides, soluble amyloid precursor protein alpha and beta, neurofilament light proteins, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1; and inflammatory CSF markers: interferon gamma, interleukin (IL) 1B, IL2, IL4, IL5, IL8, IL10, IL12p70, IL13, and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

RESULTS:

The mean age (mean±S.D.) was similar in patients with CS in remission (44.9±14 years) and healthy subjects (42.3±15.7 years; P=0.726). No differences were observed in the concentrations of any neurodegenerative biomarkers between the patients and healthy subjects. Nor were the concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers different between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

The pattern of neurodegenerative and inflammatory biomarkers in the CSF of patients with CS in remission does not differ from that of the healthy subjects. The underlying mechanisms of the cognitive deficits in patients with CS in remission are different from those observed in patients with neurodegenerative disorders and remain to be explained.

PMID:
23733371
DOI:
10.1530/EJE-13-0205
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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