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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2013 Jun;61(6):957-62. doi: 10.1111/jgs.12279. Epub 2013 Jun 3.

Mechanical muscle function and lean body mass during supervised strength training and testosterone therapy in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels.

Author information

1
Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. tkvorning@health.sdu.dk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the effect of strength training and testosterone therapy on mechanical muscle function and lean body mass (LBM) in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study.

DESIGN:

Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled.

SETTING:

Odense, Denmark.

PARTICIPANTS:

Men aged 60 to 78, with bioavailable testosterone levels of less than 7.3 nmol/L and a waist circumference greater than 94 cm were randomized to testosterone (50-100 mg/d, n = 22) placebo (n = 23) or strength training (n = 23) for 24 weeks. The strength training group was randomized to addition of testosterone or placebo after 12 weeks. Subjects performed supervised strength training (2-3 sets with 6- to 10-repetition maximum loads, 3 times per week).

MEASUREMENTS:

Testosterone levels, maximal voluntary contraction and rate of force development, and LBM were obtained at 0 and at Weeks 12 and 24 of the intervention.

RESULTS:

No changes in any variables were recorded with placebo. In the strength training group, maximal voluntary contraction increased 8% after 12 weeks (P = .005). During the following 12 weeks of strength training rate of force development increased by 10% (P = .04) and maximal voluntary contraction further increased (P < .001). Mechanical muscle function was unchanged in men receiving only testosterone for 24 weeks. LBM increased only in men receiving testosterone (P = .004).

CONCLUSION:

Strength training in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels may improve mechanical muscle function, but this effect occurs without a significant increase in LBM. Clinically, only the combination of testosterone therapy and strength training resulted in an increase in mechanical muscle function and LBM.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00700024.

PMID:
23730808
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.12279
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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