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Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013 Sep;149(3):500-5. doi: 10.1177/0194599813491223. Epub 2013 May 31.

Costal cartilage is a superior implant material than conchal cartilage in the treatment of empty nose syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of endonasal microplasty in treating empty nose syndrome by comparing the use of costal and conchal cartilage implants to construct neoturbinates.

STUDY DESIGN:

Case series with chart review.

SETTING:

Tertiary referral center.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

A total of 31 patients who were diagnosed with empty nose syndrome and underwent endonasal microplasty with conchal cartilage (n = 17) or costal cartilage implants (n = 14) were included. Each patient's clinico-demographic profile was reviewed to compare the conchal cartilage group and the costal cartilage groups. Pre- and postoperative Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-25) scores were also compared.

RESULTS:

Both groups showed a significant improvement in SNOT-25 scores following surgery (P < .05). The group who received costal cartilage implants demonstrated more significant improvements than the conchal cartilage group in terms of the mean difference between pre- and postoperative SNOT-25 scores (P = .023). Symptom outcomes related to depression demonstrated significant improvements in the conchal cartilage group (P < .05), while in the costal cartilage group, in addition to these 3 variables, 7 items related to functional problems also demonstrated significant improvements (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Costal cartilage is a more useful material than conchal cartilage as implants for the treatment of empty nose syndrome patients.

KEYWORDS:

Sino-Nasal Outcome Test; autologous; conchal cartilage; costal cartilage; empty nose syndrome; endonasal microplasty; homologous; neoturbinate; turbinectomy

PMID:
23728068
DOI:
10.1177/0194599813491223
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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