Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Asthma. 2013 Oct;50(8):884-90. doi: 10.3109/02770903.2013.810750. Epub 2013 Jul 15.

Depressive symptomatology, quality of life and disease control among individuals with well-characterized severe asthma.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine .

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

A thorough examination of the relationship of asthma severity and control with symptoms of depression is needed to identify groups of asthmatics at high risk for poor disease control outcomes. This study examines the relationship of symptoms of depression with severity and control in a well-characterized cohort of asthmatics and healthy controls.

METHODS:

Depressive symptoms and quality of life were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. Disease control was measured by a composite index incorporating symptoms, activity limitation and rescue medication use.

RESULTS:

Individuals with asthma (n = 91) reported more symptoms of depression than controls (n = 36; p < 0.001). Those with severe asthma (n = 49) reported more symptoms of depression (p = 0.002) and poorer asthma control (p < 0.0001) than those with not severe asthma. Worse asthma control was associated with more depressive symptoms in severe (r = 0.46, p = 0.002) but not in not severe (r = 0.13, p = 0.40) asthmatics. The relationship of symptoms of depression among severe asthmatics was attenuated by disease control. Exploratory analyses identified specific disease symptom characteristics, as opposed to exacerbations, as associated with symptoms of depression.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among individuals with severe asthma, increased symptom burden is positively associated with risk for co-morbid depression. These findings point to a need for regular mood disorder screenings and treatment referrals among this group. Further research is warranted to examine whether treatment of comorbid depression improves treatment adherence and asthma-related quality of life.

PMID:
23725317
PMCID:
PMC4029326
DOI:
10.3109/02770903.2013.810750
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center